Wednesday, June 25, 2014

#CBR6 Reviews #17-18: More on Art Therapy...

I promise that I will read and review something different soon, I’ve just been very focused on my school readings right now. And so, here is some more on art therapy! And two very different approaches and focuses within the field at that:

- Studio Art Therapy: Cultivating the Artist Identity in the Art Therapist by Catherine Moon
- Introduction to Art Therapy: Sources & Resources by Judith A. Rubin

Judith Rubin’s Introduction to Art Therapy is just that: an overview of the different possibilities inherent in the field of art therapy, taking a look at the various pioneers of the field who contributed to its history and progression to today, as well as many of the different theories and practical models that may inform one’s practice. The book is a conglomerate of a broad scope of information, yet doesn’t go too in-depth in any particular area. Interspersed throughout, Rubin provides personal cases that she has faced with a number of clients over the years, showing how each client who receives art therapy is different, and therefore requires a sensitivity from the therapist as to which approach will work best for them. While interesting, I found the book to be a little thin in terms of providing just a quick glimpse of a wide range of topics and theories, without providing any true of understanding of any of them. But as a starting-point to possibly inspire more researching and reading into one of the many areas covered? That’s basically what I felt like I was getting into.

Catherine Moon’s Studio Art Therapy on the other hand, was presented as though the reader was already an art therapist (or someone studying art therapy) themselves. Although she clearly presented some of the practical and theoretical bases of the field and her practice, the majority of the book came across as a personal reflection of the importance of knowing the self before being able to help others or to sense what another may need. Many of the stories of clients and experiences Moon presents show how much she relies on her senses and being attuned to the situation and energy of those around her to determine what best to do in any therapeutic situation. Maybe coming across as a bit whimsical or metaphysical at times, I appreciated how sensitive Moon appears to be to others and their needs, as well as her own. This is definitely a skill that I am trying to work on in myself, particularly for my own future studies and (hopefully) work in art therapy.

At the end of the day, Judith Rubin’s introductory book might be good for someone who wants an overview of the field of art therapy, while Catherine Moon’s would be beneficial to those looking at practicing art therapy and being unsure as to how one might come to foster their identity as an artist, a therapist, or both.

[Be sure to visit the Cannonball Read main site!]

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